Articles Tagged with “marine life”

13 Articles found tagged with “marine life”.

  • Green Turtles Eat Plastic that Looks Like Food

    It may seem obvious but it has now been scientifically proven that green turtles eat plastic that closely resembles sea grass, their preferred food. This research is important, as it shows what kind of plastic pollution is a particular problem.

    By Alex Taylor on 11th October 2019
  • Turtle Species’ Conservation Success

    Analysis of conservation efforts in the Amazon and Orinoco basins has revealed that a total of 85 past or present projects has helped to conserve 147,000 female South American River Turtles.

    By Alex Taylor on 2nd August 2019
  • Turtle Nesting Jeopardised by Microplastics

    Tiny pieces of microplastic that persist in the natural environment are accumulating along beaches surrounding the Gulf of Mexico, jeopardising the survival of loggerhead turtles.

    By Alex Taylor on 29th June 2018
  • Vaquita Rescue Gone Wrong

    The most endangered marine mammal in the world, the vaquita, is facing an uncertain future as a rescue plan involving taking some animals into captivity has been abandoned after the death of a captured individual.

    By Alex Taylor on 13th December 2017
  • Logging Threatens Leatherbacks

    Debris from logging activities in tropical forests is threatening the survival of hatchling leatherback turtles and the success of their mothers at one of the world’s most important nesting sites.

    By Alex Taylor on 7th May 2017
  • Fish Evolve to Avoid Fishing

    New research supports the creation of more marine reserves that are protected from fishing activities, as it has been discovered that fish can evolve to be more cautious and avoid fishing nets.

    By Alex Taylor on 2nd April 2017
  • Alarming Decline of Ocean Wildlife

    Between 1970 and 2012, marine vertebrates have declined by 49% and some fish species have declined by nearly 75%.

    By Alex Taylor on 23rd September 2015
  • Urgent Action Needed to Protect Dugongs

    Mortality was found to rise in the winter months between November and March, which coincides with a greater congregation of dugongs and an increase in the level of fishing activity.

    By Alex Taylor on 16th June 2015