Research - Page 20

  • Pine Martens: The Comeback

    Small populations survived in Wales and areas of northern England at very low densities, but the only viable populations left could be found in the North West Highlands of Scotland where persecution pressures were less.

    By Alex Taylor on 1st May 2013
  • 2012: A Bad Year for Butterflies in the UK

    Last year was the UK’s second wettest year on record and although the high rainfall has benefited some species, 2012 was the worst year for butterflies since scientific monitoring began in 1976.

    By Alex Taylor on 10th April 2013
  • Last of the Leatherbacks?

    This is an animal that can grow up to 6 feet long, can weigh up to 2,000 pounds, can dive to depths of nearly 4,000 feet and migrates more than 7,000 miles

    By Alex Taylor on 6th March 2013
  • Where Have All The Lions Gone?

    Scientists at Duke University reported that more than two-thirds of lions in Africa have disappeared in the last 50 years. Rapid human population growth, and all the threats to wildlife that this brings with it, has reduced both lion populations and the savannah in which they live.

    By Alex Taylor on 13th February 2013
  • Can Crabs Feel Pain?

    According to new research, yes crabs can feel pain…

    By Amy Featherstone on 22nd January 2013
  • How will Climate Change Affect the North Atlantic Current?

    Core samples have shown us that the last ice age caused the North Atlantic Drift to slow down, but it is thought that its path changed between then and now. However, the study of past climate shows that the Gulf Stream has stopped completely several times in the past, causing rapid climate change.

    By Amy Featherstone on 7th January 2013
  • Last of the Lemurs?

    Facing threats such as illegal logging and hunting, many species are heading towards extinction, but a new survey has revealed that the situation is far worse than previously realised and in fact, lemurs are now considered to be the most endangered group of mammals in the world.

    By Alex Taylor on 25th July 2012
  • Do Dolphins Mourn Their Dead?

    A new report suggests that dolphins (like chimpanzees and elephants) may feel similar emotions to humans, specifically regarding a sense of ‘family’ and deep grief for the loss of a loved one.

    By Guest Bloggers on 2nd December 2011