Articles by Alex Taylor

Alex Taylor

I am a freelance conservation journalist, with a BSc in Conservation Biology and a Master of Research postgraduate degree in Ecology and Environmental Biology. I blog about new research in the field of conservation biology, and my main area of interest is species conservation.

  • Ring-tailed Lemurs in Crisis

    Madagascar’s iconic primate, the ring-tailed lemur, is in desperate need of conservation action as scientists estimate there are less than 2500 individuals left in the wild.

    By Alex Taylor on 8th January 2017
  • Cheetah Numbers Crash

    The world’s fastest animal is racing towards extinction. New research has revealed that just 7,100 individuals remain and may be lost forever if urgent conservation action is not taken.

    By Alex Taylor on 30th December 2016
  • Newly Discovered Birds Are Already Endangered

    A reassessment of all bird species has discovered that many newly recognised species are already extinct or threatened with extinction thanks to human activity.

    By Alex Taylor on 18th December 2016
  • Giraffe Populations Plummet

    Giraffes are at risk of extinction after suffering a nearly 40% decline in numbers over the past 30 years.

    By Alex Taylor on 11th December 2016
  • Sniffing Rats May Save Pangolins

    African giant rats are being trained to sniff out pangolins being trafficked for illegal trade.

    By Alex Taylor on 11th December 2016
  • Bushmeat Hunting Driving Biodiversity Loss

    A new study has found that hunting for the bushmeat trade has dramatically reduced wildlife biodiversity in the forests near rural villages in Gabon, Central Africa.

    By Alex Taylor on 11th December 2016
  • Jaguar Movements Restricted

    A large gene-based survey based on nearly 450 samples in MesoAmerica has identified areas of conservation concern for the region’s jaguars.

    By Alex Taylor on 22nd November 2016
  • Link Between Amphibian Disease and Climate Change

    New research has been published that shows that climate change will make the impact of the chytrid fungus disease worse. Already at high altitudes, frogs and toads are being infected at increasingly high rates.

    By Alex Taylor on 14th November 2016