Animal Conservation

  • Tourists Object to Macaque Exploitation

    It is not uncommon to see animals being exploited for tourist’s photo opportunity. Encouraging new research shows that, in Morocco, 88% of people who were surveyed object to the use of barbary macaques as photo props for ethical or animal welfare reasons.

    By Alex Taylor on 11th February 2019
  • Native Tree Increase Following Rat Removal

    The eradication of invasive rats on the remote Pacific island Palmyra Atoll has led to positive benefits for native trees and the many other species who live in this habitat.

    By Alex Taylor on 29th January 2019
  • Drying wetland Drives Muskrat Decline

    46 years worth of satellite imagery has shown that Canada’s Peace-Athabasca Delta has been slowly drying. This has driven the decline of the muskrat, and may have repercussions for the many species that prey on it.

    By Alex Taylor on 24th January 2019
  • Bat Cull Unwarranted

    A major cull of the endangered Mauritius flying fox has been announced to prevent fruit crop damage, however new research has found the bat is responsible for only some damage, and could be managed effectively without the need to cull.

    By Alex Taylor on 20th December 2018
  • New Hope for the Northern White Rhino

    New genetic analysis has discovered that northern and southern white rhino populations have had contact throughout history. This means that genes from southern white rhinos could be used to successfully rescue their critically endangered northern cousins.

    By Alex Taylor on 14th December 2018
  • Damming Caused Decline

    The damming of the Yangtze River has been shown to have caused declines in population size and spawning ground capacity of the critically endangered Chinese sturgeon.

    By Alex Taylor on 10th December 2018
  • Mammals Cannot Evolve Fast Enough to Escape Extinction Crisis

    Nature’s defence mechanism, evolution, cannot keep up with the extermination of species by humans. If conservation efforts are not improved, so many mammal species will go extinct in the next five decades that nature will need 3-5 million years to recover.

    By Alex Taylor on 9th December 2018
  • Loss of Lemurs May Endanger Large Trees

    Lemurs are some of the world’s most endangered animals. But they play a vital role in their ecosystems, and a new study has shown that saving them may be the key to saving Madagascar’s largest trees.

    By Alex Taylor on 5th November 2018
  • New Tool Helps Prioritise Conservation

    A new tool has been developed by researchers in Canada that determines which conservation actions help the most species and ensures that limited funds are well spent.

    By Alex Taylor on 21st October 2018