Animal Conservation

  • Fishing for Mammals

    An innovative new technique has been developed to survey for animal species. Scientists have used environmental DNA shed by animals in water to provide a snapshot of the local mammal community.

    By Alex Taylor on 20th March 2020
  • Improved Assessments of Asiatic Lions

    An alternative method for monitoring Asiatic lions using whisker patterns and body markings to identify individual lions has been demonstrated. This could lead to improved population estimates and help inform conservation policy.

    By Alex Taylor on 28th February 2020
  • Tracking Turtles

    Scientists have used innovative ways to track female loggerhead turtles. The data reveals that return to the same nesting beaches to lay eggs year after year, therefore, these key locations should be a focus for conservation efforts.

    By Alex Taylor on 22nd February 2020
  • Severe Weather Impacts Wildlife

    In 2017, Hurricane Irma offered scientists the chance to study the impact of a severe weather event on white-tailed deer. They discovered that the deer changed their movement rate and their habitat selection, thus are able to alter their behaviour in order to survive.

    By Alex Taylor on 7th February 2020
  • Humanity’s Footprint is Squashing Biodiversity

    Using the most comprehensive dataset on the ‘human footprint,’ which maps the accumulated impact of human activities on the land’s surface, researchers have documented intense human pressures across the range of a staggering 20,529 terrestrial vertebrate species.

    By Alex Taylor on 31st January 2020
  • Platypus on Brink of Extinction

    Australia’s devastating drought is having a critical impact on the iconic platypus. With increasing reports of rivers drying up and platypuses becoming stranded, it is feared that local populations are declining rapidly.

    By Alex Taylor on 26th January 2020
  • Deforestation Changing Communication

    A new study on how animal communication is affected by deforestation shows that male howler monkeys howl for longer in forest interiors and natural forest edges than at man-made forest edges. This is because there are fewer resources at these edges and has implications for conservation.

    By Alex Taylor on 17th January 2020
  • Lost Species Rediscovery

    A species previously believed to be lost to science has been re-discovered. The silver-backed chevrotain was seen for the first time in 25 years on camera trap footage in Vietnam. Scientists will now study the population to determine its size and the threats to its survival.

    By Alex Taylor on 13th January 2020
  • Abrupt Land Change Impacts Local Biodiversity

    Biodiversity across the globe could be in a worse state than previously thought as current biodiversity assessments fail to take into account the long-lasting impact of abrupt land changes.

    By Alex Taylor on 10th January 2020
  • Conservation: Social as well as Scientific

    A study of local attitudes towards snow leopard conservation in Nepal has revealed that local people value the cat for the personal benefits they get from it, as well as its intrinsic value.

    By Alex Taylor on 9th January 2020