Research - Page 15

  • The Status of Marine Mammals

    A new multinational study, the first global review of Arctic marine mammals, has assessed the status of all circumpolar species and subpopulations, and highlights the precarious state these animals are in.

    By Alex Taylor on 27th May 2015
  • The Comeback of the Galapagos Tortoise

    The global population was down to just 15 tortoises by the 1960s. Now there are some 1,000 tortoises breeding on their own. The population is secure. It’s a rare example of how biologists and managers can collaborate to recover a species from the brink of extinction.

    By Alex Taylor on 10th November 2014
  • Aliens in the Med

    Aliens have invaded the Mediterranean, and are disrupting the ecosystem’s delicate balance.

    By Alex Taylor on 22nd October 2014
  • Rapid Evolution of Frog Defences

    Until very recently it was believed that evolutionary processes only happened over very long periods of time, but these findings indicate that the presence of a non-native predator can induce a process of rapid evolutionary change in a native species.

    By Alex Taylor on 15th July 2014
  • Save the Nautilus

    When their numbers are depleted it will take a long time for populations to recover. Better education on the consequences of purchasing Nautilus shells, more research and better regulation appears to be essential for their survival. We can only hope that it is not too late.

    By Alex Taylor on 25th June 2014
  • When Birds and Buildings Collide

    It is not that birds are unaware of their surroundings; they are simply not primed, via learning or evolution, to detect hazardous man-made structures that extend into their airspace.

    By Alex Taylor on 27th May 2014
  • Bees using plastic waste to build hives

    Researchers discovered that two solitary bee species in Canada are using polyurethane and polyethelene-based plastics in the formation and closing of their brood cells.

    By Grace Dickins on 19th March 2014
  • Trouble for America’s Amphibians

    On average, the rate of loss of populations of all amphibians in the USA is 3.7% per year. The scientists believe that if this rate does not change, these species will disappear from half of the habitats that they currently occupy in around 20 years.

    By Alex Taylor on 29th July 2013