Bird Conservation - Page 10

  • J is for – Jay!

    It’s a woodland species, but will also be found in parks and gardens with mature trees, and is always a welcome sight: indeed, it’s one of the most common species for non-birders to notice and remark on.

    By Chris Foster on 28th May 2012
  • I is for Iceland Gull

    Iceland gulls breed in the Arctic, mainly Greenland and northern Canada, and move south during winter to feed away from the worst of the polar winter.

    By Chris Foster on 14th May 2012
  • Songbirds Saved by Wolves

    Two scientists from the University of Montana made the connection between the decline of deciduous trees and a decrease in songbird populations in the mountains of Arizona.

    By Alex Taylor on 18th April 2012
  • G is for Gadwall & Garganey

    One of the top five sites for gadwall in the UK is the Thames Estuary – another reason, if any were needed, why dropping a whopping great airport into the middle of it would be a seriously bad idea.

    By Chris Foster on 16th April 2012
  • F is for Fieldfare

    They’re one of the two thrush species which visit Britain in large numbers for the autumn and winter, alongside the handsome and perhaps better known redwing.

    By Chris Foster on 2nd April 2012
  • Tropical Birds Feel the Heat of Climate Change

    The wide range of numbers on future possible extinctions is because of the many decisions about climate change that must still be made that could affect the outcome, such as will carbon reductions mitigate temperature rises?

    By Alex Taylor on 28th March 2012
  • Saving Asia’s Vultures

    The manufacture of diclofenac was made illegal in 2006, but the problem persists. The human form of the drug is not banned, so livestock owners can get around the veterinary ban by using the human form to treat their cattle

    By Alex Taylor on 21st March 2012
  • Will Killing Pine Martens Save Capercaillies?

    Pine martens are gradually recovering in Scotland but there are new accusations facing this animal from the Scottish Game Keepers Association (SGA).

    By Richard Hassall on 13th March 2012
  • An A-Z of British Birds, B is for Bashful

    The famous booming is the most conspicuous thing they’ll ever do, though, unless you happen to see one in flight. Most of the time they’re masters of disguise.

    By Chris Foster on 2nd February 2012
  • American Birds

    There is a well-established conservation movement made up of millions of ordinary Americans who say these natural wonders are an indispensable part of the nation’s heritage.

    By Chris Foster on 15th December 2011